Seasonal Series

Inspired by the change of seasons and as a way to mark the passing of time in a place where the landscape obscures it, I began creating pieces that reflect the seasons.  The central theme behind this series is the passing of time--the cycle of birth, life, death and rebirth, and the human capacity to summon lifeforce after a period of withdrawal. Just as harvest returns every spring after winter’s death, so, too, the human soul is reborn time and again.

In this series:

Ritual - What is ritual? It seems there are as many definitions as there are theories of development. If we define ritual, in broad terms, as a system of symbolic acts based on a specific set of rules, then perhaps the solution to explaining its scope depends upon finding the oldest practicing culture: the origin. It is generally believed that totemic clans and totemism--the belief that humans have a mystical relationship with a spirit being, animal or plant, may be the earliest stage of religion and thus the origin of ritual. Beliefs regarding the various stages of development and evolution, however, vary widely. With this piece, I was inspired by origin stories, myths, and the broad spectrum of ritualistic practices (including religious, spiritual, ceremonial and cultural) that have defined our species since the beginning of time. Societal norms change, but our belief in ritual remains. 
 

Espiritu del Bosque - a nontraditional take on Ajá, the Yoruba patron of the forest. Ajá represents our need to protect the natural world and embodies courage, hope and inclusivity.

Idun's Fall - In Norse mythology, the goddess Idun is the wife of Bragi, the god of poetry. She is the keeper of magical fruit and associated with eternal youth. Like Persephone in Greek Mythology, Idun is kidnapped from her homeland. Her departure, rather than affecting the growth of crops and vegetation, causes the gods to grow old. Here she is seen navigating away in a ship that resembles a constellation. The boat of stars was inspired by the I-Ching Diagram No 8, which is that of the Autumnal Equinox.

Taker of Seeds - inspired by Carl Sandburg's poem "Autumn Movement."

Spellbound - diosa de todo. Mother of all myth.

Sol - named after the Norse goddess of the sun. During Ragnarok (the end of the world in Norse mythology), Sol is swallowed by the wolf, Skoll, along with the sun, and the Earth submerges into the waters.

Persephone - named after the Greek goddess of grain and vegetation and the wife of Hades, ruler of the Underworld. 

Skadi - named after the goddess of winter in Norse mythology. Skadi is a huntress who governs over the mountains and the wilderness.

Original Artwork Letisia Cruz